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Wrist

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome- Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

is one of the most common causes of wrist pain. Symptoms include a dull ache in the wrist and forearm with pain which may radiate into the hand and fingers. The pain is often worse at night.

Carpal tunnel syndrome typically starts gradually with a vague aching in your wrist that can extend to your hand or forearm. Common carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms include

  • Tingling or numbness in your fingers or hand, especially your thumb and index, middle or ring fingers, but not your little finger. This sensation often occurs while holding a steering wheel, phone or newspaper or upon awakening. Many people "shake out" their hands to try to relieve their symptoms. As the disorder progresses, the numb feeling may become constant.

  • Pain radiating or extending from your wrist up your arm to your shoulder or down into your palm or fingers, especially after forceful or repetitive use. This usually occurs on the palm side of your forearm.

  • A sense of weakness in your hands and a tendency to drop objects.

Ganglion Cyst

A ganglion cyst or wrist ganglion is a small lump which appears in the wrist, often attached to a tendon. Some are not painful but others may require treatment.

Symptoms

Most ganglions form a visible lump, however, smaller ganglions can remain hidden under the skin (occult ganglions). Although many ganglions produce no other symptoms, if a cyst puts pressure on the nerves that pass through the joint, it can cause pain, tingling, and muscle weakness.

Large cysts, even if they are not painful, can cause concerns about appearance.

 

 

 

Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren's contracture is a fixed flexioncontracture of the hand where the fingers bend towards the palm and cannot be fully extended (straightened). It is an inherited proliferative connective tissue disorder which involves the palmer fascia of the hand.

Symptoms

Dupuytren's contracture usually begins as a thickening of the skin on the palm of your hand. As it progresses, the skin on the palm of your hand may appear puckered or dimpled. A firm lump of tissue may form on your palm. This lump may be sensitive to the touch but usually isn't painful.

In later stages of Dupuytren's contracture, cords of tissue form under the skin on your palm and may extend up to your fingers. As these cords tighten, your fingers may be pulled toward your palm, sometimes severely.

Trigger Figure

Trigger figure occurs when the tendons in the finger become inflamed and thickened. This prevents them from moving properly so they contract, sometimes suddenly causing the finger to snap in a bent position.

Symptoms

Symptoms of trigger finger usually start without any injury, although they may follow a period of heavy hand use. Symptoms may include:

  • A tender lump in your palm

  • Swelling

  • Catching or popping sensation in your finger or thumb joints

  • Pain when bending or straightening your finger

Stiffness and catching tend to be worse after inactivity, such as when you wake in the morning. Your fingers will often loosen up as you move them.

Sometimes, when the tendon breaks free, it may feel like your finger joint is dislocating. In severe cases of trigger finger, the finger cannot be straightened, even with help. Sometimes, one or more fingers are affected.

De Quervain’s Disease

De Quervain's tendinitis occurs when the tendons around the base of the thumb are irritated or constricted. The word "tendinitis" refers to a swelling of the tendons. Thickening of the tendons can cause pain and tenderness along the thumb side of the wrist. This is particularly noticeable when forming a fist, grasping or gripping things, or when turning the wrist.

Symptoms

  • Pain may be felt over the thumb side of the wrist. This is the main symptom. The pain may appear either gradually or suddenly. Pain is felt in the wrist and can travel up the forearm. The pain is usually worse when the hand and thumb are in use. This is especially true when forcefully grasping objects or twisting the wrist.

  • Swelling may be seen over the thumb side of the wrist. This swelling may occur together with a fluid-filled cyst in this region.

  • A "catching" or "snapping" sensation may be felt when moving the thumb.

  • Pain and swelling may make it difficult to move the thumb and wrist.

  • Numbness may be experienced on the back of the thumb and index finger. This is caused as the nerve lying on top of the tendon sheath is irritated.

Mallet Figure-Mallet Figure

occurs when the patient is unable to straighten the tip of the finger without assistance. Pain is felt on the back of the finger where injury to a finger tendon has occurred.

 
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